Norway Forest Planted For a Future Library

Via Vice, artist Katie Paterson has planted a 1,000 tree forest with the intention of them all being used for a special library of books made one year, every year, for a 100 years.
Scottish artist Katie Paterson has turned what sounds like a nonsensical question into a reality. She's planted a Future Library of 1,000 trees in a forest on the outskirts of Oslo, Norway. She'll then invite a different writer every year for the next century to write a manuscript to be held in trust, unread and unopened, until 2114. Then the trees will be harvested and turned into a special anthology of books, the first of which is being written now by speculative fiction author Margaret Atwood.
Read the full interview, as well as info on the artist on Vice.com.

This Forest Will Become an Anthology of Books in 100 Years by Nell Frizzell.

The Punch Bowl by Dan Searing

A mixture history and recipe book for punches, The Punch Bowl by Dan Searing provides authoritative notes on classic favorites with color photos throughout. A great book for punch recipes, as well as an informative little book on the history of this drink.



Read the full review and try the recipe for Hot Mulled Apple Cider and Brandy Punch.


+Renee Shelton
Twitter: @121degreesC

Clean Start by Terry Walters

Terry Walters is a proponent of clean eating, or choosing sustainable foods that are healthy for you and the environment. She also runs a website and blog with tips and resources for the clean eating movement. Terry's other book, Clean Food, started readers talking about embracing new choices in the family kitchen by choosing to eat foods that are in season from locally grown food sources and that are minimally processed. Clean Start has over 100 recipes all vegan and gluten-free.

Read the review for this cookbook and try the recipe for Cabbage Saute with Tart Cherries and Crisp Apples.



+Renee Shelton
Twitter: @121degreesC

The New Sonoma Cookbook: Simple Recipes for More Healthy Living by Connie Guttersen


The New Sonoma Cookbook is a revised version of The Sonoma Diet Cookbook, written by Connie Guttersen, featuring many recipes, meal options, and tasty yet nutritious approaches to dieting and weight reduction. The Sonoma Diet's name comes from the Sonoma region of Northern California and uses the Mediterranean way of eating as a foundation.



The review and the recipe for Corn, Bean, and Tomato Salad can be found on the Cookbook Papers - New Sonoma Cookbook: Simple Recipes for More Healthy Living.





















+Renee Shelton
Twitter: @121degreesC

Three Great Baking Titles To Try: Puddin, The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Book, and Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread

The latest on the baking front for cookbooks. Included in these reviews: recipe for dark chocolate pudding, basic recipe for a gluten-free flower, and images of 4 different recipes from the Beekman farm cookbook. Click each link for the review on Cookbook Papers. Enjoy!

  • Puddin' is a handy one-topic cookbook to have on the baking bookshelf, with many things related to pudding to try. Recipe for the Chocolate Pudding with cocoa and 70% chocolate.

 

  • The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook is about as authentic as you can find when it comes to old-fashioned baking. The authors, Brent Ridges and Josh Kilmer-Purcell, divided the cookbook into seasons rather than baking chapters, bringing a bit of their farm life into their recipes. 4 different images of book recipes and photographs.



  • Gluten-free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread recipes are pretty straight forward and cover all the basic breads you'll ever really need. If you want to experiment with your own recipes, she gives quite a few to start off with. Below is her recipe for 'high-quality' gluten-free flour which includes rice flours and potato flour, potato and tapioca starches, xanthan gum, and a powered pectin, all doing their part to produce something similar to a gluten flour when baked.




Saving Vegetable Seeds by Fern Marshall Bradley



Blurb:
This illustrated, step-by-step guide shows you how to save seeds from 20 of the most popular vegetable garden plants, including beans, carrots, peas, peppers, and tomatoes. You'll learn how each plant is pollinated (key to determining how the seed should be saved), how to select the seeds to collect, and how to process and store collected seeds. Grow the varieties you love, year after year!
Saving Vegetable Seeds: Harvest, Clean, Store, and Plant Seeds from Your Garden was a short read, but filled with all the basic information you'll really need to start saving seeds from your garden. Author Fern Marshall Bradley broke the entire process down by separating the steps into these three chapters: Getting Started with Saving Seeds; Seed-Saving Techniques; and Saving Seeds, Crop by Crop.

The beginning of the book, the basics of seeds are identified and defined, such as the cross section of a seed, the parts of a flower and how seeds form from them, and self-pollinating vs. cross-pollinating crops. In the seed saving chapter, she walks the reader through her five steps of seed saving: taking care of your plants; harvesting the seeds; cleaning and drying the seeds; packing and storing; and testing viability. Included is how to control pollination (important in open-pollinated types of vegetables), and how to hand pollinate.

Probably the most helpful for me as a gardener was how to test seed viability. I've saved lots of seeds from my garden over the years, but doing a test on the seeds viability was something I've never done. The vegetables Bradley details are beans, carrots, corn, cucumbers, lettuce, melons and watermelons, onions and leeks, peas, peppers, radishes, squash, and tomatoes.

Handy book if you are planning on doing some seed saving, with the varieties she details.

Book Info:



Disclosure: This book was provided by the publisher, and any opinions are my own.

Jamie's Food Revolution: Rediscover How to Cook Simple, Delicious, Affordable Meals by Jamie Oliver

Learn something new and pass it on. That's the running theme throughout Jamie's Food Revolution. Jamie Oliver is on a quest to educate readers on the benefits of good food and simple preparation. And by teaching, he is hoping the newly educated cooks will pass on their knowledge with someone else ("preferably four").

Read the review to this lovely cookbook on the Cookbook Papers.

Jamie's Food Revolution by Jamie Oliver

http://cookbookpapers.blogspot.com/2014/07/jamies-food-revolution-by-jamie-oliver.html












Salad Samurai: 100 Cutting-Edge, Ultra-Hearty, Easy-to-Make Salads You Don’t Have to be Vegan to Love



Cookbook of the Week: Salad Samurai by Terry Hope Romero

There are a few reasons why I love Terry Romero’s cookbooks: engaging text, downright delicious recipes, and the fact that you don’t even have to be vegan to enjoy what she makes. It’s actually included in the name her latest cookbook: Salad Samurai: 100 Cutting-Edge, Ultra-Hearty, Easy-to-Make Salads You Don’t Have to be Vegan to Love
For the review and recipe, read Salad Samuri on Sand and Succotash blog.

Amazon.com:




Sewing: The Magic Pattern Book by Amy Barickman

Summer always inspires me to create. And with the help of The Magic Pattern Book, by Amy Barickman, creating simple summer wearables is simple enough. Start out with 6 basic wardrobe pieces and end up with 36 different looks. Pieces included: tank top, skirt, dress, a cardigan, a coat, and an accessory (3 different hats, a scarf, and two bags/purses). Which is the whole concept behind the book, to take a single pattern and completely transform it or piece it together in different ways to 'magically' create different looks.

Read the full review of Amy Barickman's The Magic Sewing Book.

Mayim Bialik's New Cookbook: Mayim's Vegan Table


Mayim Bialik has been busy in the kitchen, and her new book Mayim’s Vegan Table is the result. With a simple layout and quick recipes, the book would make a welcome addition on the cookbook shelf for a home cook just getting into vegan cooking. For veteran vegan cooks, she offers ways to spice up the family menu.

Read the full review on Sand and Succotash, as well as try her recipe for Quinoa Salad with Veggies and Herbs.


Born of Persuasion by Jessica Dotta

Book blurb:
The year is 1838, and seventeen-year-old Julia Elliston’s position has never been more fragile. Orphaned and unmarried in a time when women are legal property of their fathers, husbands, and guardians, she finds herself at the mercy of an anonymous guardian who plans to establish her as a servant in far-off Scotland.

With two months to devise a better plan, Julia’s first choice to marry her childhood sweetheart is denied. But when a titled dowager offers to introduce Julia into society, a realm of possibilities opens. However, treachery and deception are as much a part of Victorian society as titles and decorum, and Julia quickly discovers her present is deeply entangled with her mother’s mysterious past. Before she knows what’s happening, Julia finds herself a pawn in a deadly game between two of the country’s most powerful men. With no laws to protect her, she must unravel the secrets on her own. But sometimes truth is elusive and knowledge is deadly.
I liked this book, I really did, but the problem with series is that they sometimes end at awful times, such as this book. But that is the end and I'll start at the beginning.

The book is set in 1838, where women in society were considered property. Finding herself in a desperate situation at 17, Julia is easily manipulated. The mystery that surrounds Mr. Macy, a man who ends up her husband, was fun to read, and I wish I had all the books to finish the story at one sitting. People in Victorian society were easily judged, and I found reading this book (and others in this time period) not so forgiving of others.

Julia never speaks up or voices her opinion. She practically goes along with whatever she is told. It may sound frustrating now, but in the early 1800s, what was a girl to do in her situation: not much else. The story is a Gothic romance, and Dotta's writing style flows easily from scene to scene. Her descriptions of what life was like back then was great. I enjoyed the many layers that she writes about, and I will look for the other books as they come out.

Book Information:
Disclosure: This book was provided by the publisher and any opinions are my own.

Yearly List of Book and Reading Holidays

Here are the major special days dedicated to reading this year. Enjoy.
  • Digital Learning Day - March 13, 2015
    From DigitalLearningDay.org:
  • "Digital Learning Day is about giving every child the opportunity to learn in a robust digital environment everyday, with the goal of success in college and a career."
  • Freedom of Information Day - March 16, 2015
    From FirstAmendmentCenter.org:
"National FOI Day is an annual, daylong program of speaking and discussion by specialists in various aspects of freedom of information."
  • School Library Month - April, 2015
    From the American Association of School Librarians (ala.org):
"School Library Month (SLM) is the American Association of School Librarians' (AASL) celebration of school librarians and their programs."
  • National Drop Everything and Read Day -"D.E.A.R. Day" - April 12, 2015
    From DropEverythingandRead.com:
    "D.E.A.R. stands for “Drop Everything and Read,” a national month-long celebration of reading designed to remind folks of all ages to make reading a priority activity in their lives."
  • National Library Week - April 12-18, 2015
    From ala.org:
    "Celebrate National Library Week 2015 with the theme, 'Unlimited possibilities @ your library'." 
    World Book Night - April 23, 2015
    From the ala.org:
"WORLD BOOK NIGHT is a celebration of literacy by publishers, bookstores, libraries and individuals who love books and reading." Fun!
  • Library Card Sign-up Month - September 2015
    From AtYourLibrary.org:
"[During this month] the American Library Association (ALA) and libraries all across the country are celebrating the value of getting a library card."
  • Banned Books Week - September 27-October 3, 2015
    From BannedBooksWeek.org:
"Banned Books Week is the national book community's annual celebration of the freedom to read."
  • Picture Book Month - November 2015
    From PictureBookMonth.com:
"Picture Book Month is an international literacy initiative that celebrates the print picture book during the month of November."