Three Great Baking Titles To Try: Puddin, The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Book, and Gluten-Free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread

The latest on the baking front for cookbooks. Included in these reviews: recipe for dark chocolate pudding, basic recipe for a gluten-free flower, and images of 4 different recipes from the Beekman farm cookbook. Click each link for the review on Cookbook Papers. Enjoy!

  • Puddin' is a handy one-topic cookbook to have on the baking bookshelf, with many things related to pudding to try. Recipe for the Chocolate Pudding with cocoa and 70% chocolate.

 

  • The Beekman 1802 Heirloom Dessert Cookbook is about as authentic as you can find when it comes to old-fashioned baking. The authors, Brent Ridges and Josh Kilmer-Purcell, divided the cookbook into seasons rather than baking chapters, bringing a bit of their farm life into their recipes. 4 different images of book recipes and photographs.



  • Gluten-free on a Shoestring Bakes Bread recipes are pretty straight forward and cover all the basic breads you'll ever really need. If you want to experiment with your own recipes, she gives quite a few to start off with. Below is her recipe for 'high-quality' gluten-free flour which includes rice flours and potato flour, potato and tapioca starches, xanthan gum, and a powered pectin, all doing their part to produce something similar to a gluten flour when baked.




Saving Vegetable Seeds by Fern Marshall Bradley



Blurb:
This illustrated, step-by-step guide shows you how to save seeds from 20 of the most popular vegetable garden plants, including beans, carrots, peas, peppers, and tomatoes. You'll learn how each plant is pollinated (key to determining how the seed should be saved), how to select the seeds to collect, and how to process and store collected seeds. Grow the varieties you love, year after year!
Saving Vegetable Seeds: Harvest, Clean, Store, and Plant Seeds from Your Garden was a short read, but filled with all the basic information you'll really need to start saving seeds from your garden. Author Fern Marshall Bradley broke the entire process down by separating the steps into these three chapters: Getting Started with Saving Seeds; Seed-Saving Techniques; and Saving Seeds, Crop by Crop.

The beginning of the book, the basics of seeds are identified and defined, such as the cross section of a seed, the parts of a flower and how seeds form from them, and self-pollinating vs. cross-pollinating crops. In the seed saving chapter, she walks the reader through her five steps of seed saving: taking care of your plants; harvesting the seeds; cleaning and drying the seeds; packing and storing; and testing viability. Included is how to control pollination (important in open-pollinated types of vegetables), and how to hand pollinate.

Probably the most helpful for me as a gardener was how to test seed viability. I've saved lots of seeds from my garden over the years, but doing a test on the seeds viability was something I've never done. The vegetables Bradley details are beans, carrots, corn, cucumbers, lettuce, melons and watermelons, onions and leeks, peas, peppers, radishes, squash, and tomatoes.

Handy book if you are planning on doing some seed saving, with the varieties she details.

Book Info:



Disclosure: This book was provided by the publisher, and any opinions are my own.

Jamie's Food Revolution: Rediscover How to Cook Simple, Delicious, Affordable Meals by Jamie Oliver

Learn something new and pass it on. That's the running theme throughout Jamie's Food Revolution. Jamie Oliver is on a quest to educate readers on the benefits of good food and simple preparation. And by teaching, he is hoping the newly educated cooks will pass on their knowledge with someone else ("preferably four").

Read the review to this lovely cookbook on the Cookbook Papers.

Jamie's Food Revolution by Jamie Oliver

http://cookbookpapers.blogspot.com/2014/07/jamies-food-revolution-by-jamie-oliver.html